SOCIAL MEDIA BLOGS, NEWS & EVENTS

Automotive Dealers and the Social Media Dilemma

10 March 2011 | 12:42 am

Social media provides a two-way opportunity for automotive dealers to engage with their customers. Organisations are now expected to be on social media, it is a preferred channel for customers to receive offers and get involved in qualitative feedback on products, services and ideas.

One of the big debates for automotive dealers is to decide whether to have a single national profile or multiple local profiles on sites such as Facebook and Twitter. Getting the right style of profile to the right customer segment is more important than ever. How will your customers want to engage with you?

Why National?

National pages have the advantage that they attract a wide array of consumers and any messages posted will be seen by the majority of people who ‘like’ or ‘follow’ the organisation. The brand can build a large fan base and engage with consumers whilst providing a single place for them to engage with each other.

However, using national pages reduces the targeted approach; a lot of information sent out may not be relevant for every fan. If fans are uninterested they are likely to ignore and block the company from their news feed or even remove them completely, leaving the brand at a disadvantage.

Do you also want to combine all the possible types of engagement- people asking about when their car might be ready, complaining about a recent service or asking about discounts whilst you are trying to build up the brand with your own content?

Why Local?

Local pages may not have the amount of followers that national pages do but this is not necessarily a bad thing. Pages become more manageable for employees and the relevance to consumers is increased therefore meaning a better response and deeper engagement with the audience. By personalising messages to different segments companies can gain a better connection with their publics. For example, on Facebook, Sytner MINI Solihull targets consumers in the surrounding area and posts pictures of customers picking up their new MINI. This feature gets consumers interested and involved but would be very difficult to coordinate and keep up the high proportion of interest for all the Sytner MINI branches on a national page.

Local pages still allow for national campaigns to be put out across all channels especially with the help of certain software available today. Nationwide messages can still be sent out in conjunction with area specific posts in order to gain the most out of local brand profiles.

What do you think?

So with these points in mind, it is over to you to decide what the best approach for your brand is, will you stay national or will you delve deeper with consumers and go local?

 

 

 

Adam Desmond, CrowdControlHQ